ThePotholeGardener

An aesthetically pleasing if not quite street legal approach to fixing East London's potholes.

A guy named Steve, a.k.a. The Pothole Gardener, has done the impossible: he's found a way to make people (and animals) excited about potholes.

Last month, Steve posted this short video documenting East London residents as they encountered his "green" solution to his neighborhood's pothole problem. One bus driver he filmed liked the garden potholes so much he decided to take one home for himself (he later put it back in its appropriate place).

A more recent pothole project attracted a hedgehog, an endangered species in Britain due to urbanization.

To stay up to date on The Pothole Gardener's projects, you can subscribe to him on YouTube or follow him on Twitter.

Top image courtesy of The Pothole Gardener.

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