A box with just enough space for one performer and one spectator.

Folk in a Box is the world’s smallest and most mobile music venue. Sponsored by the Heritage Arts Company, the project consists of a travelling Thoreauvian wooden box that journeys across Britain - from the Tate, the SouthBank Centre, and other cultural landmarks to nondescript "back streets, high streets, hill tops, and front rooms" - bringing with it the most exclusive seat in town, wherever that may be.

The windowless space is large enough to accommodate just one performer (usually a folk artist) and one spectator (who is given just one song) and is lit by a sole light bulb screwed into the ceiling, a moody atmosphere and a strange dynamic which yield an experience that can prove as unnerving and awkward as it can be charming and endearing.

Since launching in 2009, the wandering pavilion has gone through several make-shift incarnations, including this mossy,’Woodstock’ rendition, which were always built using recycled/recovered materials. This year, however, the project will adopt a new, more sturdy performing space. Designed by architects David Knight and Cristina Monteiro, the latest box is comprised of 14 prefabricated panels, snapped together to form the structure’s base, walls, and ceiling. Each of the panels was individually carved and painted by “artisan carpenters”; when assembled, a vaguely Art Nouveau motif is made legible on all of the box’s sides. The audience enters and exits through a single dwarf-like door, while a double door on the opposite wall is reserved for the performer. The bespoke hut, which will also double as a whiskey bar, will premiere this month in London.

Folk in a Box: The Making of! from David Knight on Vimeo.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    Are Electric Vehicles About to Hit a Roadblock?

    With the EV tax credit on the chopping block and Tesla experiencing production delays, dreams of an electric future might prove elusive in the U.S.

  2. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  3. Lynch's map of the NYC subway is geographically accurate.
    Maps

    What a Geographically Accurate New York City Subway Map Looks Like

    One cartographer has done the heavy lifting, and rail fans are pumped.

  4. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  5. Design

    The Weird Geography of Population Density

    What if people were mapped like mountains?