Andrew Evans

A photographer layers history over buildings that no longer remain.

BLDGBLOG returned from a brief hiatus to dish out some ghostly composite photographs of demolition sites in Philadelphia. In Andrew Evans’ layered compositions, razed buildings appear like phantoms, eerily seeping back into the now vacant sites of Philadelphia’s contemporary landscape.

Cranes and skyhooks appear like dissonant memories, faded memories of the past grafted upon Evans’ somber black-and-white snapshots of the present. Evans’ erasure not only introduces multiple processes and layers of history into each image, but—taken at face value—the photographs envision fascinating hologram-like architectures. Depicted in shifting opacities, the structures appear simultaneously in the process of construction and decay, and the landscape reveals its very real state of constant flux. Did someone say palimpsest?

For more, check out Andrew Evans’ Flickr page.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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