One of America's most famous train stations gets a new logo.

Grand Central is turning 100. As a gift, New York City got it a new logo.

The sleek design - a clock tower that mimics the famous timepiece in the station's central hall - has hands that point to 7:13 or 19:13 in "trainmaster's time," a nod to the year Grand Central opened. The station was slated for demolition in the 1970s, but saved by preservationists.  It was restored completely in the 1990s.

The design comes from Pentagram’s Michael Bierut, and began appearing on the station's Terminal screens Tuesday. Below, Pentagram explains the thinking behind the design:

The new logo takes as its inspiration one of the landmark building’s most well known icons—the century-old Tiffany clock atop the information booth in the center of the Main Concourse ... The image is centered over the name “Grand Central”; the word “Terminal” has been left out of the logo in recognition of how most people actually refer to the place.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A tow truck operator hooks up a damaged bus in 2011 in New York.
    POV

    Should Transit Agencies Panic?

    Many predict that new technology will doom public transportation. They’re wrong.  

  2. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

  3. Transportation

    How Toronto Turned an Airport Rail Failure Into a Commuter Asset

    The Union Pearson Express launched with expensive rides and low ridership. Now, with fares slashed in half and a light rail connection in the works, it’s a legitimate transit alternative for workers.

  4. A dockless bikeshare bike on the streets of D.C.
    Transportation

    What People Mean When They Call Dockless Bikeshare a 'Nuisance'

    In Washington, D.C., some residents are not enthusiastic about the free-range rent-a-bikes.

  5. Transportation

    The Automotive Liberation of Paris

    The city has waged a remarkably successful effort to get cars off its streets and reclaim walkable space. But it didn’t happen overnight.