One of America's most famous train stations gets a new logo.

Grand Central is turning 100. As a gift, New York City got it a new logo.

The sleek design - a clock tower that mimics the famous timepiece in the station's central hall - has hands that point to 7:13 or 19:13 in "trainmaster's time," a nod to the year Grand Central opened. The station was slated for demolition in the 1970s, but saved by preservationists.  It was restored completely in the 1990s.

The design comes from Pentagram’s Michael Bierut, and began appearing on the station's Terminal screens Tuesday. Below, Pentagram explains the thinking behind the design:

The new logo takes as its inspiration one of the landmark building’s most well known icons—the century-old Tiffany clock atop the information booth in the center of the Main Concourse ... The image is centered over the name “Grand Central”; the word “Terminal” has been left out of the logo in recognition of how most people actually refer to the place.

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