One of America's most famous train stations gets a new logo.

Grand Central is turning 100. As a gift, New York City got it a new logo.

The sleek design - a clock tower that mimics the famous timepiece in the station's central hall - has hands that point to 7:13 or 19:13 in "trainmaster's time," a nod to the year Grand Central opened. The station was slated for demolition in the 1970s, but saved by preservationists.  It was restored completely in the 1990s.

The design comes from Pentagram’s Michael Bierut, and began appearing on the station's Terminal screens Tuesday. Below, Pentagram explains the thinking behind the design:

The new logo takes as its inspiration one of the landmark building’s most well known icons—the century-old Tiffany clock atop the information booth in the center of the Main Concourse ... The image is centered over the name “Grand Central”; the word “Terminal” has been left out of the logo in recognition of how most people actually refer to the place.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  2. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  3. Design

    Long Before Levittown, Brooklyn Boasted Mass-Produced Housing

    The small community of Gerritsen Beach was a pioneering cookie-cutter suburb in the 1920s.

  4. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

  5. A woman, forced into the street by blocked sidewalks, pushes a stroller down a street in Boston.
    Perspective

    Why Cities, Not Individuals, Should Clear Snow From Sidewalks

    Most U.S. cities leave the responsibility of sidewalk snow removal to homeowners, landlords, and businesses. The result: endangered pedestrians.

×