Hadley1978/Wikipedia

Sure, the sticks have Sasquatch and the Jackalope. But what creepy cryptids lurk in thriving American cities?

If you want to catch a cryptid doing its thing in America, common sense would deem you drive far out into the woods where humankind rarely ventures. After all, it's typically hunters and hikers who wind up having awkward run-ins with Bigfoot or the Flatwoods monster.

But city dwellers who want a taste of the supernatural ought not to despair. A deep riffling through the musty archives of American folklore reveal several beasties who have given up their woodsy pad for the fast-paced life of the big city. See what monsters could be dealing with condo fees and long lines at Starbucks in the gallery below.

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