New York is the place to be for design and architecture.

In his "State of the City" speech last January, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg suggested that investing in technology will help New York become the "capital of innovation for the 21st century," giving the new Cornell University tech campus on Roosevelt Island as the latest example.

That may well be true. But when it comes to innovation and job growth, the city should continue to nurture another important creative sector: design and architecture. That's according to a new report from the Center for an Urban Future, which shows that New York's design and architecture sector is a bright spot for the city's future as a leader in innovation and economic growth.

They break down the numbers in this handy infographic:

Here's how the report puts it:

[I]t is not just scientific research institutions and engineering schools—like the one that Cornell and Technion are building on Roosevelt Island—that provide this kind of spark. In New York, design and architecture schools arguably have been as, or more, important to the city’s success in the innovation economy.
 
New York design universities such as Parsons The New School for Design, the Fashion Institute of Technology, Pratt Institute and the School of Visual Arts have been critical catalysts for innovation, entrepreneurship and economic growth. Their graduates have produced dozens of start-up companies that set up locally—something that has eluded most of the city’s scientific research institutions. Graduates of the city’s design and architecture schools founded many of New York’s most visible and influential design firms, including Studio Daniel Liebeskind, Diller Scofidio Renfro, SHoP Architects, Smart Design, Ralph Applebaum Associates, Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs and Donna Karan International.
 
They also provide the talent pipeline for New York City’s creative industries—including the city’s fast-growing design and architecture sectors.
Click here to read the full report.
 
Top image courtesy of Parsons The New School for Design

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