A ceramic tray designed to fit your radiator.

The radiator, once a sign of standardized production and functional beauty, is now an unseemly sight, a physical reminder of cultural and technological obsolescence and to the embattered – other adjectives that may play: dingy, dirty, rundown, condemned–pre-war New York apartments you can barely afford, utterly lacking in charm and, perhaps, heat. Chances are you’ve got one, so why not optimize it with the “Natural Wave”, a ceramic tray that locks onto the top of your everyday radiator. Designed by Byung-seok You, the tray acts likes a heat plate that keeps your hot beverages (hot chocolate for me) and baked goods (pretzel crossants, just saying) warm throughout the long, cold winter nights. That is, until it inevitably breaks down, the heat lost, and those brief moments of radiance wrenched away as fast as they came. Happy Spring!

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Samuel Medina

Samuel Medina is a contributor to Architizer.

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