Reuters

A bride with a 1.85-mile train.

This photo, by Reuters' Bogdan Cristel, captures a bride breaking the Guinness World Record for...longest train. The 2,750 meter long train broke a previous record of 2,488 meters, and was sown over 100 days with 1,857 needles and cost $8,000 in materials alone. The dress was created by the Andree Salon fashion house in honor of this year's biannual Wedding Fair in Bucharest.  

The previous record was held by a Dutch designer, giving the victory a nationalist overtone. The Netherlands campaigned against the country's inclusion in the European Union's visa-free travel zone. "If the Netherlands does not allow us into Europe, we'll take them out of the world records book," Alin Caraman, an organizer of the wedding promotion, told the Associated Press.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    The FBI's Forgotten War on Black-Owned Bookstores

    At the height of the Black Power movement, the Bureau focused on the unlikeliest of public enemies: black independent booksellers.

  2. a photo of people sunbathing on a hot summer day in Central Park in New York City
    Environment

    The New York City of 2080 Will Be as Hot as Arkansas

    A new study finds the climate “twin city” for hundreds of places across the United States.

  3. Protestors hold a sign that reads "Respect Democracy Our Vote Matters"
    Equity

    The Conservative Backlash Against Progressive Ballot Measures

    In many states, ballot initiatives on expanding Medicaid, limiting gerrymandering, and raising the minimum wage swept to victory in November. Now lawmakers are doing their best to reverse them.

  4. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  5. Transportation

    With Trains Like Schwebebahn, No Wonder Germans Love Public Transit

    Infrastructure like this makes it clear why Germany continues to produce enthusiasm for public transit, generation after generation.