Reuters

A bride with a 1.85-mile train.

This photo, by Reuters' Bogdan Cristel, captures a bride breaking the Guinness World Record for...longest train. The 2,750 meter long train broke a previous record of 2,488 meters, and was sown over 100 days with 1,857 needles and cost $8,000 in materials alone. The dress was created by the Andree Salon fashion house in honor of this year's biannual Wedding Fair in Bucharest.  

The previous record was held by a Dutch designer, giving the victory a nationalist overtone. The Netherlands campaigned against the country's inclusion in the European Union's visa-free travel zone. "If the Netherlands does not allow us into Europe, we'll take them out of the world records book," Alin Caraman, an organizer of the wedding promotion, told the Associated Press.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a man surveying a home garage.
    Transportation

    How Single-Family Garages Can Ease California's Housing Crisis

    Given the affordable housing crisis, California cities should encourage single-family homeowners to convert garages into apartments and accessory dwelling units.

  2. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  3. a photo of Northern Virginia's Crystal City.
    Life

    When Your Neighborhood Gets a Corporate Rebrand

    From National Landing to SoHa, neighborhoods often find themselves renamed by forces outside the community, from big companies to real estate firms.

  4. Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California
    Life

    America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

    Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

  5. Environment

    No, Puerto Rico’s New Climate-Change Law Is Not a ‘Green New Deal’

    Puerto Rico just adopted legislation that commits it to generating all its power from renewable sources. Here’s what separates that from what’s going on in D.C.