The abandoned book depository.

Today's postcard, by Shane Gorski, captures the abandoned Detroit Book Depository. Once the city's main post office, the building became a storage facility for Detroit Public Schools. On March 4, 1987, a fire destroyed much of the building - instead of rebuilding, the city simply abandoned it and started anew.

Years later, an investigation by the Detroit Free Press found thousands of books still in their plastic wrap, untarnished by the blaze. Gorski writes "of all the exploring I’ve done so far, I rank this right up there ... the building conjures up thoughts within’ you… “How did this happen?” “How many children have gone without textbooks in the city?” “How can the Detroit Public School Administration be so irresponsible?!”

See more of the shots of the building here and read more here.

Submit your photos of cities in decay to atlanticcities.postcard@gmail.com.

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