Urine-soaked eggs as afternoon snack.

At the end of a tough day of school in Dongyang, a city in China's Zhejiang province, dozens of egg vendors line up across he city. But the eggs on offer are no ordinary eggs - some are cooked in water, but others are warmed in the urine of virgin boys. Vendors say these specially-prepared eggs lead to good health. One told MSNBC:

"If you eat this, you will not get heat stroke. These eggs cooked in urine are fragrant," said Ge Yaohua, 51, who owns one of the more popular "virgin boy eggs" stalls.  "They are good for your health. Our family has them for every meal. In Dongyang, every family likes eating them."

Many Dongyang residents, young and old, said they believed in the tradition passed on by their ancestors that the eggs decrease body heat, promote better blood circulation and just generally reinvigorate the body.

Preparing the eggs takes almost an entire day - after soaking and boiling the eggs in urine, vendors crack them open and allow them to simmer for several more hours. They cost about .$.24, nearly twice that of a regularly-prepared egg.

 Photo by: Aly Song/Reuters

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