Reuters

One year after the earthquake, the city tries to rebuild.

Yesterday marked the one-year anniversary of the Japan's earthquake and tsunami which killed thousands and set off a nuclear crisis. This photo, by Reuters photographer Kim Kyong Hoon, documents the memorial in Iwaki, Fukushima. In other news:

  • Evacuees wonder when it will be safe to return to their homes. One elderly woman told the CBC that "the disaster took everybody’s life and hope ... we are retired and were enjoying the rest of our lives growing plants. Now everything is gone."
  • Japanese automakers have brought their plants back online, and production is up. 
  • A then-and-now slideshow, courtesy of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

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