A debate over what color to paint a town landmark.

Today's postcard, by Flickr user Kevin Dooley, comes from Miami, Arizona, a city in the midst of a beautification campaign. The town's cultural center will use a $112,591 grant to, among other things, repaint the site. 

But there's some controversy over a key question - what color to paint the former school building. Board members have been looking into “historical paint pallet of neutral color schemes,” they say it has ranged in color from 1920s institutional green to concrete gray.

According to the Arizona Silver Bullet:

The museum board needs to consider the size of the building in their planning and choose something that “looks historically accurate but doesn’t stand out so it’s garish.” Nevertheless museum officials want to start the painting soon to avoid the “unbearably hot” weather expected in summer.

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