Artists turn half a room into a wild wall of street art and leave the other half stark white; the results are incredible.  

Earlier in the year, a small gallery in Brisbane was thrown into the spotlight due to the frenzied reception of Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Obliteration Room.’ There, Kusama debuted an interactive installation that invited the gallery’s youngest visitors to plaster a stark white interior with colorful polka dot stickers. It was fascinating to see the accelerated transformation of the space from a pristine white interior into a vibrant and anarchic site of visual overload. A similar Jekyll-and-Hyde contrast has been crystallized in a hotel room in Marseille, France, where artist Tilt has left his mark in the form of a half-graffitied interior. 

Though little has been unearthed regarding the story behind Tilt’s ‘Panic Room,’ the photographs truly speak for themselves. The room, one of five at a hotel that receives a regular rotation of guest artists, is dramatically torn in half. Upon entering, the hotel guest immediately steps into a space eerily devoid of color, save for hanging picture frames that neatly capture the essence of what’s in store.

What lies in store would be the other half of the room, a fragment of the furnished interior that has been thoroughly covered in layers upon layers of graffiti. The bed, the dresser, the mirror, the curtains, a chair, and a few cacti are some of the objects partially or wholly ensconced by Tilt’s domesticated street art. The most absorbing detail is undoubtedly the unerring dividing line that separates the immaculate from the chaotic, carefully slicing a few objects in half. In visibly constraining the vibrant, freeform disorder of graffiti, ‘Panic Room’ attests to the spatially transformative abilities of two-dimensional illusion.

via SLAMXHYPE

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A toddler breathes from a nebulizer while sitting in a crib.
    Environment

    How Scientists Discovered What Dirty Air Does to Kids’ Health

    The landmark Children’s Health Study tracked thousands of children in California over many years—and transformed our understanding of air pollution’s harms.

  2. Design rendering of a high-tech floating city.
    Environment

    Floating Cities Aren’t the Answer to Climate Change

    UN-Habitat is looking at high-tech urban islands as a potential survival fix for communities at risk from rising seas. This isn’t what resilience looks like.

  3. Life

    Who’s Really Buying Property in San Francisco?

    A lot of software developers, according to an unprecedented new analysis.

  4. A map of Baltimore and its surrounding leafy suburbs.
    Environment

    Every Tree in the City, Mapped

    Researchers at Descartes Labs are using artificial intelligence to make a better map of the urban tree canopy.

  5. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.