Designboom

A product that unexpectedly combines electricity and nature.

Just in time for spring is the ’38′ series of chandeliers by Omer Aberl of Bocci, a web of small plants, glass orbs, and spindly wires that evokes the fantastic imagery of sci-fi futures, wherein "smart" plant life are imbibed with the powers of locomotion, autonomy, and, of course, electricity. Focusing on the latter, one thinks of the charged field in The Prestige with the soil itself capable of mediating and transmitting electrical currents to light orchards of light bulbs.

Aberl’s luminescent flora seem to extend the idea (and reality?) of this type of hybridized botany: small plants are tucked within the voids of the spheres, made of hand-blown glass, while others hold lanterns. The image is a collision and integration of historically opposed, now long-consolidated forms of organic life and electronic hardware.

Images via Designboom.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Amazon HQ2

    Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

    The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

  2. Design

    A History of the American Public Library

    A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

  3. A photo of a new car dealership
    Transportation

    Subprime Auto Loans Are Turning Car Ownership Into a Trap

    A record 7 million Americans are three months late on their car payments, revealing what could be cracks in the U.S. economy.

  4. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  5. Life

    The Town Where Retirees Can’t Retire

    In fast-aging pockets of rural America, older residents are going back to work. But not always because they need the money.