Designboom

A product that unexpectedly combines electricity and nature.

Just in time for spring is the ’38′ series of chandeliers by Omer Aberl of Bocci, a web of small plants, glass orbs, and spindly wires that evokes the fantastic imagery of sci-fi futures, wherein "smart" plant life are imbibed with the powers of locomotion, autonomy, and, of course, electricity. Focusing on the latter, one thinks of the charged field in The Prestige with the soil itself capable of mediating and transmitting electrical currents to light orchards of light bulbs.

Aberl’s luminescent flora seem to extend the idea (and reality?) of this type of hybridized botany: small plants are tucked within the voids of the spheres, made of hand-blown glass, while others hold lanterns. The image is a collision and integration of historically opposed, now long-consolidated forms of organic life and electronic hardware.

Images via Designboom.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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