Courtesy: Steve Faletti

An artist turns radiators, water spouts and stuffed animals into lamps.

At first glance, designer Steve Faletti’s “Radiant Floor Lamp” appeared to be another ingenious use for the apartment radiator, whose distinctive steel tubes have been seemingly wrapped in a luminous skin that sets the wall alight. Upon further inspection, however, it is apparent that the fluted cage is actually a row of bent fluorescent bulbs, faux pressure wheel in tow, and that the entire assemblage is in fact powered by the nearest wall outlet.

The lamp is part of serious of one-offs with which Faletti tries to “give new meaning and form” to the vagrant and ephemeral light we tend to take for granted. Another piece cleverly affixes a light bulb to the end of a water spout, while a third humorously reimagines the Furbee (RIP) as an interactive (and furry) night light. Faletti hopes his cheeky creations help in “exploring our relationship to the objects and technologies that provide us with ample and ubiquitous interior light.” Or something like that.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  2. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  3. photo: Developer James Rouse visiting Harborplace in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
    Life

    What Happened to Baltimore’s Harborplace?

    The pioneering festival marketplace was among the most trendsetting urban attractions of the last 40 years. Now it’s looking for a new place in a changed city.

  4. Design

    Before Paris’s Modern-Day Studios, There Were Chambres de Bonne

    Tiny upper-floor “maids’ rooms” have helped drive down local assumptions about exactly how small a livable home can be.

  5. Design

    Why Amsterdam’s Canal Houses Have Endured for 300 Years

    A different kind of wealth distribution in 17th-century Amsterdam paved the way for its quintessential home design.

×