Courtesy: Steve Faletti

An artist turns radiators, water spouts and stuffed animals into lamps.

At first glance, designer Steve Faletti’s “Radiant Floor Lamp” appeared to be another ingenious use for the apartment radiator, whose distinctive steel tubes have been seemingly wrapped in a luminous skin that sets the wall alight. Upon further inspection, however, it is apparent that the fluted cage is actually a row of bent fluorescent bulbs, faux pressure wheel in tow, and that the entire assemblage is in fact powered by the nearest wall outlet.

The lamp is part of serious of one-offs with which Faletti tries to “give new meaning and form” to the vagrant and ephemeral light we tend to take for granted. Another piece cleverly affixes a light bulb to the end of a water spout, while a third humorously reimagines the Furbee (RIP) as an interactive (and furry) night light. Faletti hopes his cheeky creations help in “exploring our relationship to the objects and technologies that provide us with ample and ubiquitous interior light.” Or something like that.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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