Reuters

The building height of One World Trade Center rose above 1,250 feet today, surpassing the Empire State Building.

It's been more than 10 years since the North and South towers of the World Trade Center complex crumbled, making the Empire State Building the tallest building in New York. No longer.

When the first steel column on 100th floor of the new 1 World Trade Center - known as Freedom Tower - was put in place earlier today, the building regained its status as the tallest in New York City, rising past 1,250 feet.

When completed, the tower, including the height of its antenna, will reach 1,776 feet, the third tallest in the world. Though the Wall Street Journal pops the celebratory balloons by pointing out Dubai’s Burj Khalifa is nearly 1,000 feet taller.

The Associated Press also takes a look at the complexities and controversies that come with building height records. (Technically, One World Trade Center isn't New York's tallest building, yet, if you count the antenna of the Empire State Building. Plus, no records can officially be broken until the building is complete and occupiable.) You can dig into the building height record controversy here, or take a look at the new (though incomplete) Manhattan skyline, along with recent photos of the One World Trade Center in the slideshow below. 

Top image: Reuters/Eduardo Munoz

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