An artistic new poster, on sale at Etsy.

“I’m a big fan of large cities, and it always fascinates me how they’re little worlds in their own sense,” writes Reinhard Krug. Though the artist’s latest series of prints is called ‘Islands,’ his collaged images of New York, Sydney and Cape Town appear more like floating asteroids, coated with a barnacle-like crust of skyscrapers and infrastructure.

In making these intergalactic visual allusions, Krug’s urban portraits depict iconic cities in abstract isolation, reminiscent to the tiny worlds of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s Little Prince. Meanwhile, the saturated hues of the prints mimic the painted photographs once churned into postcards, evoking the same “wish you were here” sentiment that is forthcoming yet, at the same time, innately distant to the viewer.

Pick up a limited edition print on Etsy.

Islands, New York
Islands, New York

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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