A creative pulley system allows apartment-dwellers to stretch their green thumb.

While plans are in the works for a 100,000 square-foot hydroponic rooftop farm in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, urban gardening options are slightly more limited for the average city dweller without access to a sprawling warehouse rooftop. As a solution, Paris-based design collective Barreau&Charbonnet offer the Volet Végétal, a system of planters that uses a drawbridge-like contraption to utilize the space directly outside an apartment window.

Rows of custom-sized planters are fitted into a wooden frame that is then mounted against the windowsill. A pulley system allows one to pivot the entire frame horizontally, extending five feet perpendicular to the window. To water, trim, and harvest the plants, one simply reels the planters back into a vertical position for easy access. In colder months, the entire frame can be moved indoors, serving as a free-standing indoor garden. As Natalia Repolovsky mentioned on Shoebox Dwelling, the Volet Végétal functions much like an obsolete fire escape, extending access to that precious commodity we call space beyond the small interiors of many city apartments.

All images via Shoebox Dwelling.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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