Geographers figured out which U.S. counties are the most greedy, gluttonous and slothful.

Which parts of America are most doomed for a fiery afterlife? Back in 2009, geographers from Kansas State University mapped it out, using clever proxies for greed, sloth, gluttony, lust, jealousy, et al. Below, a look how their maps turned out:

Greed was calculated by comparing average incomes with the total number of inhabitants living beneath the poverty line.

Sloth, we should note, was calculated by comparing expenditures on arts, entertainment, and recreation with the rate of employment.

Hat tip.

Photo credit: David Evison /Shutterstock

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A tow truck operator hooks up a damaged bus in 2011 in New York.
    POV

    Should Transit Agencies Panic?

    Many predict that new technology will doom public transportation. They’re wrong.  

  2. Equity

    Even the Dead Could Not Stay

    An illustrated history of urban renewal in Roanoke, Virginia.

  3. Orange traffic cones save parking spaces on a neighborhood street in South Boston.
    Life

    The Psychology of Boston's Snow Parking Wars

    In Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia, an informal code allows residents to claim a parking space after shoveling it out. But the practice is often at odds both with the law and with the mores of changing neighborhoods.

  4. Equity

    Where Amazon HQ2 Could Worsen Affordability the Most

    Some of the cities dubbed finalists in Amazon’s headquarters search are likely to see a greater strain on their housing market, a new analysis finds.

  5. In predominantly black neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., dockless bikesharing companies like LimeBike are making inroads.
    Transportation

    Can Dockless Bikeshare Pump Up Cycling's Diversity?

    In Washington, D.C., a slew of private companies are shaking up the bike scene’s status quo and drawing riders from the city's African-American community.