Geographers figured out which U.S. counties are the most greedy, gluttonous and slothful.

Which parts of America are most doomed for a fiery afterlife? Back in 2009, geographers from Kansas State University mapped it out, using clever proxies for greed, sloth, gluttony, lust, jealousy, et al. Below, a look how their maps turned out:

Greed was calculated by comparing average incomes with the total number of inhabitants living beneath the poverty line.

Sloth, we should note, was calculated by comparing expenditures on arts, entertainment, and recreation with the rate of employment.

Hat tip.

Photo credit: David Evison /Shutterstock

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