Allan Hill has been caring for (and inhabiting) a rundown Detroit factory building.

Living in an abandoned factory isn't for everyone, but for the last seven years, it's suited Allan Hill just fine.

TheAtlantic.com's video channel editor, Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg, introduces Hill and the short film, saying:

For the past seven years, Allan Hill has been caring for (and inhabiting) a rundown building on the site of what was once the Packard plant. "In 20 years, people won't even know of this place," he reflects. "Young people will say, 'Well, what's a Packard?' At another point they might say, 'What's a Chevrolet?' Or, 'What's a Honda?' You know, at the rate that we're going." 

This video is only one part of a series of documentaries titled This Must Be The Place. The creators of the series, David Usui and Ben Wu, talked about their project in an earlier interview over on the video channel. 

The Packard Plant first opened in 1911 and was designed by Detroit-based architect Albert Kahn. It's scheduled for demolition this spring.

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