Even 47 years ago, American architects saw the perils of sprawl and car-oriented development.

The Atlantic's video channel editor, Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg brings us No Time for Ugliness, a 1965 video sponsored by the American Institute for Architects. In it, the beautifully shot film makes the case for better cities, better neighborhoods, and less suburbia.

No Time for Ugliness highlights case studies in urban renewal (like Detroit's Lafayette Park) and historic preservation (like Washington, D.C.'s Georgetown). It also warns us of the uniformity of the American suburb and the thoughtless environment that results from car-related development.

Take a look here:

Videos originally courtesy the Prelinger Archive.

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