Reuters

Banned from a park, New York Occupiers take to camping on the sidewalks.

Spring is here, bringing with it a renewed wave of Occupy protests. In New York, a spate of activism has led to at least a dozen arrests over the last couple of days. Yesterday, 14 singing protesters serenaded themselves into handcuffs when they disrupted a Bronx foreclosure auction. Choice lyrics included "y'all are speculating off people's pain. With all due respect, you should be ashamed." Today, five more Occupiers were arrested for blocking the entrance to the New York Stock Exchange.

The arrests come on the heels of a weekend-long camp-out on the streets of downtown Manhattan. Activists were booted from their original space in Zuccotti Park last November. Now, scores have returned to sleep on the streets around the city's financial district. "It takes a tremendous amount of resources to maintain a camp," one activist told the New York Times. "But sidewalks are everywhere."

Photo credit: Reuters

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A sububan office park
    Design

    Can Detroit's Suburbs Survive a Downtown Revival?

    The city is experiencing a sustained real estate boom, poaching employers—even pro sports teams—from surrounding municipalities. Places like Southfield, Pontiac, and Dearborn will have to find ways to keep up.

  2. New housing under construction in San Marcos, California.
    POV

    Where the YIMBYs Can Win

    The defeat of SB 827, California’s ambitious pro-housing bill, masks a wider trend: Similar initiatives are on the march nationwide.

  3. Maps

    Where Commuting Is Out of Control

    Lack of affordable housing and sub-par mass transit are boosting the ranks of “super commuters” in some regions outside of pricey metros.

  4. A heavy layer of smog over Paris
    Environment

    How Much Are You 'Smoking' by Breathing Urban Air?

    A new app can tell you (and it’s not pretty).  

  5. Transportation

    When Living Near Transit Doesn't Lower Transportation Costs

    A new study that tracks a decade of real family expenses calls into question a fundamental assumption of affordability research.