Reuters

Banned from a park, New York Occupiers take to camping on the sidewalks.

Spring is here, bringing with it a renewed wave of Occupy protests. In New York, a spate of activism has led to at least a dozen arrests over the last couple of days. Yesterday, 14 singing protesters serenaded themselves into handcuffs when they disrupted a Bronx foreclosure auction. Choice lyrics included "y'all are speculating off people's pain. With all due respect, you should be ashamed." Today, five more Occupiers were arrested for blocking the entrance to the New York Stock Exchange.

The arrests come on the heels of a weekend-long camp-out on the streets of downtown Manhattan. Activists were booted from their original space in Zuccotti Park last November. Now, scores have returned to sleep on the streets around the city's financial district. "It takes a tremendous amount of resources to maintain a camp," one activist told the New York Times. "But sidewalks are everywhere."

Photo credit: Reuters

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