Reuters

Rebuilding one of the city's most famous sites.

It's been one hundred years since the Titanic began its ill-fated voyage to America from Belfast. In the century since, Belfast's time as an industrial powerhouse has come and gone. Now the city is trying to revitalize the area from where the great ship once sailed.
 
The plans include a new public park on the slipway in front of Titanic Belfast, along with a slew of new apartment buildings, eateries, and bars. It is the largest redevelopment project ever undertaken by Northern Ireland. The designer told the BBC that he strove to "get the balance right between meeting the needs of the residents in the area and creating a recreational space for the public." According to the article:
 
He said the space around attractions like Titanic Belfast can become "dead zones" in the evenings and the park would help to bring vibrancy and activity to the area after hours.

Photo credit: Cathal McNaughton / Reuters

 

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