Flickr/rkirchne

As iconic as anything above ground, these subway platforms leave riders with an added sense of the city they serve.

We've looked at the map, the logo, and even the entrance.  Finally, we've arrived at the platform.

From the preserved layers of history on the walls in Athens, to the sterile, somber curves in Washington, D.C, each system's platform offers unique insight into its personality. Varying from utilitarian to whimsical, we put together a sampling of platforms from the famous and not-so-famous subway systems around the world: 

Top image courtesy Flickr user rkirchne.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A line of stores in Westport, Connecticut
    Equity

    Separated by Design: How Some of America’s Richest Towns Fight Affordable Housing

    In southwest Connecticut, the gap between rich and poor is wider than anywhere else in the country. Invisible walls created by local zoning boards and the state government block affordable housing and, by extension, the people who need it.

  2. Environment

    A 13,235-Mile Road Trip for 70-Degree Weather Every Day

    This year-long journey across the U.S. keeps you at consistent high temperatures.

  3. A woman walks down a city street across from a new apartment and condominium building.
    Design

    How Housing Supply Became the Most Controversial Issue in Urbanism

    New research has kicked off a war of words among urban scholars over the push for upzoning to increase cities’ housing supply.

  4. A car lies buried in silt in the aftermath of the Memorial Day flood in Ellicott City, Maryland.
    Environment

    In a Town Shaped by Water, the River Is Winning

    Storms supercharged by climate change pose a dire threat to river towns. After two catastrophic floods, tiny Ellicott City faces a critical decision: Rebuild, or retreat?

  5. A photo of police officers sealing off trash bins prior to the Tokyo Marathon in Tokyo in 2015.
    Life

    Carefully, Japan Reconsiders the Trash Can

    The near-absence of public garbage bins in cities like Tokyo is both a security measure and a reflection of a cultural aversion to littering.