Courtesy: Atelier Steffen Kehrle

Atelier Steffen Kehrle has designed a kit to make urban life a little easier.

It’s hard to live in the city, but with a little hacking ethic and bit of ingenuity, you might just make it. See urban hactivist Florian Rivière’s DIY strategies to turn any city corner into a site for play and invention. While they won’t exactly re-program public space or alter your perception of the city, Atelier Steffen Kehrle‘s “survival kits” will keep you from that most dreaded of prospects–handling greasy street food with your bare hands, vulnerable, without the mediation of plastic ware or even napkins, to the noxious smells and feel endemic to a city’s food cart brand of cooking oils. The kits are made of relatively thick stainless steel and lasercut into stylized outlines of those tools deemed necessary for urban survival. There are utensils for the hungry and a bottle opener for the thirsty, but also a crucifix  for the pious and a heart for New Yorkers. Never leave home without it.

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