Reuters

The world record holder is hotly contested.

She Ping, 32, may have just broken the world's least pleasant record. Or not.

Ping, a bee-keeper from the city of Chongquing, covered his body with 33.1 kilograms of bees (about 331,000 bees), breaking the world record (set by Jiangxi province beekeeper Ruan Liangming in 2008)...or so he thought. But according to Time, many Chinese bee-keepers are competing for the title, and record keeping is spotty at beat.

The Guinness Book of World Records website offers nary a mention of Chinese bee-keepers. Instead, it lists Vipin Seth of India as the wearers the "heaviest bee mantle." Seth donned a calculated 613,500 bees in his 61.4 kg mantle, nearly double She’s recently-reported record.

 Photo credit: Reuters

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A sign outside a storefront in Buffalo, New York.
    Environment

    Will Buffalo Become a Climate Change Haven?

    The Western New York city possesses a distinct mix of weather, geography, and infrastructure that could make it a potential climate haven. But for whom?

  2. photo: A vacant home in Oakland that is about to demolished for an apartment complex.
    Equity

    Fix California’s Housing Crisis, Activists Say. But Which One?

    As a controversy over vacancy in the Bay Area and Los Angeles reveals, advocates disagree about what kind of housing should be built, and where.

  3. A syringe sits on top of a car. Houses are behind it.
    Life

    The Changing Geography of the Opioid Crisis

    A new study shows that the country faces different opioid challenges in urban and rural areas.

  4. photo: a high-speed train in Switzerland
    Transportation

    The Case for Portland-to-Vancouver High-Speed Rail

    At the Cascadia Rail Summit outside Seattle, a fledgling scheme to bring high-speed rail from Portland to Vancouver found an enthusiastic reception.

  5. Environment

    The City Known for ‘Sewer Socialists’ Actually Has Great Sewers

    Milwaukee now averages a mere 2.4 combined sewer overflows a year, thanks to a massive underground tunnel, green infrastructure, and flood-control measures.

×