Reuters

The world record holder is hotly contested.

She Ping, 32, may have just broken the world's least pleasant record. Or not.

Ping, a bee-keeper from the city of Chongquing, covered his body with 33.1 kilograms of bees (about 331,000 bees), breaking the world record (set by Jiangxi province beekeeper Ruan Liangming in 2008)...or so he thought. But according to Time, many Chinese bee-keepers are competing for the title, and record keeping is spotty at beat.

The Guinness Book of World Records website offers nary a mention of Chinese bee-keepers. Instead, it lists Vipin Seth of India as the wearers the "heaviest bee mantle." Seth donned a calculated 613,500 bees in his 61.4 kg mantle, nearly double She’s recently-reported record.

 Photo credit: Reuters

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