Courtesy: Scouting NY

A fast food restaurant in a century-old Georgian mansion.

For the last four years, Nick Carr has worked as a New York City movie location scout. That means he's explored, in his words, everywhere from "the highest rooftops to the deepest subway tunnels, from abandoned ruins to zillion-dollar luxury penthouse apartments." And lucky for us, he keeps a blog with photos of some of his quirkier discoveries.

Take, for example, this insanely elegant McDonald's on Long Island. Nothing cookie-cutter about the century-old Georgian mansion that houses the restaurant's fries and Big Macs. As Carr writes, "I practically expected a maitre d’ to greet me as I went inside."

According to Carr, the house dates back to 1795, when it was a farmhouse. It was made-over in 1860, and abandoned by 1986. McDonald's purchased the property and planned to tear the space down. Then, as Carr writes:

Thank God for the citizens of the New Hyde Park, who worked to secure landmark status for the building in 1987. McDonald’s had no choice but to restore the property and work within the parameters of the landmarks commission, which ultimately resulted in their most beautiful restaurant in America.

Below, a couple of photos. See more here.

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