Courtesy: Poh Liang Hock

It slides onto the table so you can clean underneath.

One of the challenges of living in a tiny space is coaxing it to conform to your myriad needs. Take cleaning, for example. It can be tricky to vacuum or sweep - where should the furniture go?

No longer. A clever new chair offers a plastic seat that can be lifted, allowing its owner to hang it on a table edge. According to Fast Company, designer Poh Liang Hock got the idea from watching restaurants turn chairs upside down on top of tables. "Sure, it’s a minor breach of hygiene when you consider the kinds of unsavory acts servers have been known to do to customers’ food. Nevertheless, it deserves a design solution," they write.

According to Fast Company:

Hock seems to have a penchant for cleanliness--and an eye for objects ripe for reinvention: We recently featured his ingenious self-standing broom, which also won a Red Dot. If Target really wanted to demonstrate its design savvy, it would hire this guy as an in-house designer, instead of finding another Michael Graves to stylize its products.

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