Closed since World War II, Saint-Martin's platform is currently being used to promote the new film.

The long closed Saint-Martin metro station in Paris has found new life promoting a movie to passing trains until May 25. 

Ridley Scott's Prometheus is being promoted to Parisians through a dressed-up, abandoned subway platform, resembling a cave from the movie with haunting blue lights and a stone head synonymous with much of the marketing for the movie so far.

System maps on the metro also show the movie logo in-between the stations that surround Saint-Martin, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg-Saint-Denis and République.

The station closed in 1939 at the start of World War II. It reopened after the French Liberation for a brief time, closing again due to the proximity of nearby stations.

In the past, Saint-Martin has served as a homeless shelter, with a section of it now used as a day shelter. But it also has a long history of hosting compelling visual arrangements.

During the station's brief reopening in the late 1940s, the station was used as a showcase for what kinds of ads companies could buy throughout the metro system. Some of the hand-painted ceramic tile ones still remain.

More recently, it was used to promote the Nissan Qashgai in 2010. Cars behind an elaborately lit scene sat on the platform for passing riders to see. It also hosted a Nuit Blanche art event in the same year.

Below, you can see what the promotion looks like from a moving Metro car (followed by a particularly French advertising gimmick for a different company at the next station):

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