An orchestral flash mob serenades commuters.

It's rare for a commute to be punctured by anything besides frustration. Not so for a lucky group of Copenhagen straphangers, who were treated to a performance of Grieg's "Peer Gynt" on the subway. According to the Huffington Post, the project was a collaboration between the Copenhagen Philharmonic and Radio Klassisk, a classical music radio station.

It's not the first time public transit and classical music have collided. A couple of years ago, the Washington Post recruited one of the best violinists in the world to perform six songs in a commuter-heavy subway station. In 2010, Philadephia's Opera Company organized a flash mob of 650 singers at the local Macy's - they performed the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's "Messiah."

Watch the show here:

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