The third installment in a five-part series featuring Richard Florida leading a conversation on the future of the Motor City.

"In addition to all the interesting business stuff that's beginning to happen, [Detroit's downtown] now has the infrastructure, it has the buildings" to attract businesses like Twitter. - Richard Florida

Last month, Cities readers sent in their questions and ideas on the current state of Detroit and where it's heading. Over the next several weeks, Atlantic Senior Editor Richard Florida responds by leading a conversation on the future of the Motor City.

This is the third installment. Watch the introduction to the series, along with the first installment on the state of Detroit, and second on the city's creative potential

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