Filthy Luker

An artist from the U.K. makes it look as if buildings are being strangled by a malignant Kraken.

An artist from the U.K. has found a way to make it look as if buildings are being strangled by a malignant Kraken. And for this, we the public should be eternally grateful.

The goosebump-spreading sculptures of Filthy Luker (real name, Luke) look like complete Photoshops, but they're oh-so-real. "I have been putting them up all over the world in many various places and ways since about 2004," the artist e-mails. Luker embarked upon his line of startling objects by first painting huge balloons to look like eyes. After that caught on, he built up a business devoted to custom-making blowup octopi and what appears to be alien bacteria using 3-D software and fire-retardant nylon.

Here are a few of the finer works by Luker, used with his permission. The above image of an "Octopied Building" is from Quito. You can find more on his artist and company websites.

Tentacles sprout from an old diving board in Geneva:

This guy's expression is priceless. Near London:

This "Nightmare on Hill Street" was the first tentacle attack the artist attempted. You can really see how far the work has evolved:

Ah, those beautiful eyes. From "Trees Are People Too":

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