Reuters

The city's spring festivals are booming.

It's festival season in New Orleans.

For the last two weeks, the dulcet sounds of jazz have wafted through the city during the Jazz and Heritage Festival. Last month, the French Quarter Festival had its biggest year yet, bringing in $300 million for the city. In the photo above, Dominican Sisters at the St. Louis Cathedral Academy take a breather during that event.

After Hurricane Katrina, many worried that the city would struggle to regain its status as America's good time capital. Those fears seem largely unfounded. As Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews told USA Today:

"For New Orleans, the music is the heartbeat of everything ... Now that we're on the path to becoming stronger again, everything is just looking beautiful for us. It's wonderful. I'm happy to be in New Orleans. I'm happy to be from here and be a New Orleans musician."

Photo credit: Sean Gardner/Reuters

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A small accessory dwelling unit—known as an ADU—is attached to an older single-family home in a Portland, Oregon, neighborhood.
    Design

    The Granny Flats Are Coming

    A new book argues that the U.S. is about to see more accessory dwelling units and guides homeowners on how to design and build them.

  2. Police cars outside the New York Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City
    Life

    The Great Crime Decline and the Comeback of Cities

    Patrick Sharkey, author of Uneasy Peace, talks to CityLab about how the drop in crime has transformed American cities.

  3. Transportation

    To Measure the 'Uber Effect,' Cities Get Creative

    Ride-hailing companies are cagey on all-important trip data. So researchers are finding clever workarounds.

  4. People walk through a crosswalk.
    Equity

    Great Cities Enable You to Live Longer

    Dense, well-educated, immigrant-friendly cities boost longevity—especially for the low-income.

  5. The White House is seen reflected during a rainy day in Washington, D.C.
    POV

    The City That 'This Town' Forgot

    Washington, D.C., is home to a huge concentration of reporters. Why do they miss the stories happening in their own city?