Reuters

The city's spring festivals are booming.

It's festival season in New Orleans.

For the last two weeks, the dulcet sounds of jazz have wafted through the city during the Jazz and Heritage Festival. Last month, the French Quarter Festival had its biggest year yet, bringing in $300 million for the city. In the photo above, Dominican Sisters at the St. Louis Cathedral Academy take a breather during that event.

After Hurricane Katrina, many worried that the city would struggle to regain its status as America's good time capital. Those fears seem largely unfounded. As Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews told USA Today:

"For New Orleans, the music is the heartbeat of everything ... Now that we're on the path to becoming stronger again, everything is just looking beautiful for us. It's wonderful. I'm happy to be in New Orleans. I'm happy to be from here and be a New Orleans musician."

Photo credit: Sean Gardner/Reuters

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