studio kg

The 'Parramyd' provides a framework for your vine-like plants to grow.

Nothing says failure quite as much as a weathered, rusted space frame. Yet, in pristine conditions (see Konrad Wachmann’s colossal, even animistic proto-space frame projects) it possess an aesthetic that rivals all other modes of architectural expression. When taken as a (pictorial) whole, the space frame’s superimposed latticework inevitably becomes collaged, its inherent structural legibility blurred into a moiré of thick and thin lines–a drama teased out from the anonymity of standardized steel members.

A space frame, however, does not a home (usually) make. Domesticity can neither tolerate the intense material volatility of the space frame, nor the hostility it poses towards the calm, passive life. But wait! The plants will take it!

Introducing the plant space frame from studio kg, a modular planting system comprised of interconnected tetrahedrons that guide and “tame” the course of plant growth from inside your home or office. Called ‘Parramyd‘, the system provides a framework on which to grow ivy and vine-like plants in a domestic environment. The kits come in two sizes, both sets of which can be expanded or made smaller by the addition or removal of the pyramidal modules. Utopia and your garden, back together again.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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