Reuters

A new take on the Grand Palais.

Every year, Paris's Grand Palais gets re-imagined by a famous artist, courtesy of the Monumenta project. This year, Daniel Buren plunged the space into pools of colored light. A canopy of circles (made of translucent plastic film), each touching the next, fill the space. The Guardian describes it as such:

Rather than "contesting" the architecture or "challenging" the viewer, to use the banal phraseology of museum types, Buren's work is at the mercy of the light from the Paris sky, the scudding clouds, the slanting sunlight as it enters the building.

At night, the space will be swept by roving spotlights, and. all the while, rotating audio speakers send sound roaming through the nave; voices in many languages counting and running through the alphabet, to the odd snatch of tinkly music. The sound is fairly unobtrusive, but I'd be happier without it.

Reuters

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