Edible Bus Stop

A London gardening project aims to plant food up and down a city bus line.

It was an empty strip of land on Landor Road in the Lambeth section of London, as unremarkable as the #322 bus stop it sat behind.

But last spring, a small group of locals mobilized to reclaim the spot after learning it had been put up for sale. They did a little guerilla gardening, got the support of a local politician and were eventually able to establish a permanent garden, dubbed the Edible Bus Stop.

Eventually, they hope to raise enough money through grants and donations to formally landscape the space, turning it into an urban orchard. And they'd like to expand the idea to other stops. Over the last year, the group has branched out to a second bus stop site, and they're in the planning stages for three others.

 

Ideally, they'd like their vision to sprout down the entire #322 bus route, and maybe even beyond. They've issued a design competition brief to students at Kingston University in London to develop ideas for other underused spaces at or near the 20 stops along the line. The shortlisted finalists will be put on display as part of the Chelsea Fringe Festival later this month.

Image credit: Edible Bus Stop

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