Reuters

Seoul is the most recent city to claim the record, broken 30 times in 24 years.

LEGOs function as an analog for architecture, their plastic “bricks” corresponding to their full-scale clay or cement counterparts, the “snap” and “click” that enjoins them mimicking the mortar that adheres entire walls. But rarely do the little toy modules add up to anything remotely close to actual architecture, despite the claims of parents that divine prodigious talents from the vaguely “archetypal” towers and “pomo” houses cobbled together by their would be archi-tykes. Yet, architecture–taking Adolf Loos’s stringent definition–is perhaps an accurate signifier for the 31.9 meter (105 feet) tall LEGO tower constructed in South Korea over the weekend.

The televised build, sponsored by LEGO Korea for the celebration of the toy company’s 80th birthday, was overseen by some 4,000 children who handled over 50,000 bricks over a 5-day period to erect the tower. The child-construction crew consisted of lucky contest winners who had entered a lottery pool to participate in the event, which attracted more than 30,000 visitors, reports China Daily. The plastic skyscraper stands just outside Seoul’s Olympic City complex, foregrounding a drab stadium emblazoned with the Olympic insignia. Last night, visiting premier the Crown Prince of Denmark topped off the “structure” with the record-breaking brick that edged out the previous tallest tower by just 30 centimeters in a race for height that began in 1988, when the first of the Lego architectures was built in London. Since then, 30 different records have been set and broken, so don’t expect Seoul to hold the title for too long.

Watch the video of its construction, via AFP, here.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    In Paris, a Very Progressive Agenda Is Going Mainstream

    Boosted by big sustainability wins, Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pitching bold plans to make the city center “100 percent bicycle” and turn office space into housing.

  2. photo: subway in NYC
    Transportation

    Inside Bloomberg's $1 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

    Drawing on his time as New York City mayor, Michael Bloomberg proposes handing power and money to urban leaders as part of his Democratic presidential bid.

  3. A photo of high-rises in Songdo, billed as the world's "smartest" city.
    Life

    Sleepy in Songdo, Korea’s Smartest City

    The hardest thing about living in an eco-friendly master-planned utopia? Meeting your neighbors.  

  4. photo: a couple tries out a mattress in a store.
    Equity

    What’s the Future of the ‘Sleep Economy’?

    As bed-in-a-box startup Casper files for an IPO, the buzzy mattress seller is betting that the next big thing in sleep is brick-and-mortar retail outlets.

  5. How To

    Want Solar Panels on Your Roof? Here's What You Need to Know

    A handy reference for navigating an emerging industry.

×