Reuters

Dakar's fashion scene is a powerful economic driver. Scenes from Fashion Week.

Dakar Fashion Week was started by Senegalese designer Adama Ndiaya as a way to showcase local talent. Ten years on, it's become a major fashion event.

According to Voice of America, organizers aim to "reach the heights of fashion weeks in Paris and New York, while remaining distinctly African." The event draws lines from across Africa. Marcial Tapolo (originally of Cameroon) comes from Paris for the show. 
"It's like a high-class show that she's trying to do," he told Voice of America. "Very sophisticated, which is rare in Africa, as a fashion show."

The shows were open to the public, a nod to the delicate balance needed to host a luxury event in a developing country. Below, shots from Dakar's fashion week. Photos by Reuters photographer Finbarr O'Reilly:

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