Reuters

Where are the largest concentrations of gay couples?

This month cities all across the world are partaking in Gay Pride celebrations. Jed Kolko, the chief economist at Trulia, takes a look at the neighborhoods in the U.S. with the largest gay communities ("gayborhoods").

Using 2010 U.S. Census data, which lists 646,000 same-sex households, he calculated the neighborhoods with the largest percentage of same-sex male couples:

And the largest percentage of female couples:

To put these numbers into perspective, the share of male and female same-sex households in the U.S. overall is 0.3 percent each. 

Kolko also found that gay couples tend to live in more expensive neighborhoods than the average American couple. Same-sex male couples live within zip codes where the median price per square foot is $208, while same-sex female couples live within zip codes where the median price per square foot is $139. For all U.S. households the average is $127 per square foot. The findings seem to match up with those of our own Richard Florida, who found that gay populations increase home prices in neighborhoods. Kolko has a theory as to why:

A big reason is that same-sex couples are less likely to have kids: 10% of same-sex male couples and 24% of same-sex female couples have kids in the house, compared with 41% of all married and unmarried couples. Couples without kids need less space and therefore are better able to afford desirable, expensive urban neighborhoods.

Charts courtesy of Trulia

Top image: Reuters/Jonathan Alcorn

About the Author

Tyler Falk

Tyler Falk is a fellow at The Atlantic Cities.

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