Lynette Jackson

An Atlanta-based telecommunications professional creates stunning design pieces using only her phone.

Lynette Jackson, a telecommunications professional from Atlanta, is not an architect, but her iPhone has been getting the attention of the building-obsessed, appearing on Archidose, ArchDaily and even Fast Company's design blog.

Jackson turns her architectural photography into complex art pieces, letting sections of her built subjects set the tone for the layers of design treatments, created using only the apps on her phone. She began this project as a hobby, posting her work on Flickr and Instagram. iPhoneography blog LifeinLoFi took notice, so did a blog at an architecture firm's blog. Now, her online followers wait the next round of uploads.

We chatted with Jackson about her work, exactly what she uses to make it, and what inspires her to do it:

What's your creative background?

I have always spent time drawing and painting. My favorite thing about photography is that it gives instant gratification. With an iPhone and apps the creativity can happen anywhere. I have created several series while sitting in my favorite restaurants.

What about architecture interests you?

Architecture is art. I think of completed designs as huge sculptures. I’m drawn to lines, shapes, symmetry, and order. I like order. My dad was a brick-mason; I use to spread prints on the floor and imagine the completed structure. The work was exciting, so I wanted to be an architect. Although I didn’t study architecture there's a passion, maybe an obsession, for using the iPhone to create experiments which combine architecture, design, and art.

What tools do you use to put these pieces together?

I use the iPhone camera for shooting. My apps for processing are SnapSeed, CameraMatic, PictureShow, Pixlromatic, PhotoToaster, and PicFx. For design, it’s iDesign, StripeCam PicFrame, Decim8, ImageBlender, PhotoWizard, and Phonto. I may use two or more apps to create a simple block-out shape and color filters are usually custom or the results of multiple apps.

Do people anticipate your upcoming projects on Instagram? 

I am fortunate to have really great followers who anticipate my series of four and I too anticipate their posts. It encourages me and helps drive the creativity. There is a lot of talent on Instagram.

Are there specific design periods or artists that influence these works?

I'm a visual junkie; I spend hours soaking up images. My favorite design period is the mid-20th century, mid-century modern and international graphic style. I’m inspired by several creatives- Mark Weaver, Stéphane Massa-Bidal,  Aitor Oritz, Julius Shulman, Alex Varanese, Andreas H. Bitesnich, Oscar Niemeyer, Richard Neutra, Reid Miles, Richard Paul Lohse, and others. 

What kind of feedback have you been getting?

So far the feedback has been positive. I hope that my work is respectful of architecture, it's my intention to highlight the genius of architects and their work. I have a camaraderie with other architectural iPhoneographers on Flickr and Instagram we are encouraging and inspiring each other.

You can see more of Jackson's work on her Instagram, Flickr, and EyeEm accounts.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A young girl winces from the sting as she receives the polio vaccine in 1954.
    Life

    How Mandatory Vaccination Fueled the Anti-Vaxxer Movement

    To better understand the controversy over New York’s measles outbreak, you have to go back to the late 19th century.

  2. Design

    A New Plan to Correct a Historic Mistake in Pittsburgh

    A Bjarke Ingels Group-led plan from 2015 has given way to a more “practical” design for the Lower Hill District. Concerns over true affordable housing remain.

  3. A photo of a closed street in St. Louis
    Equity

    The Curious Tale of the St. Louis Street Barriers

    Thanks to an '80s mania for traffic calming, the St. Louis grid is broken by hundreds of bollards and cul-de-sacs. Critics say it’s time to get rid of them.

  4. A photo of shoppers on University Avenue in East Palo Alto, California, which is flanked by two technology campuses.
    Equity

    An Island of Silicon Valley Affordability Says Yes to More Housing

    East Palo Alto is surrounded by tech riches, but that hasn’t necessarily helped longtime residents, who welcome a state law mandating zoning reform

  5. People eat and drink coffee inside a small coffeehouse.
    Life

    Gentrification Is Hurting Kuala Lumpur's Iconic Coffee Shops

    Traditional kopitiams, which serve sweetened coffee in no-frills surroundings, are a part of Malaysian national identity, but their survival is precarious.