Reuters

A new initiative encourages young people to paint for peace.

Yemeni capitol Sana'a is in bad shape. The city is plagued with violence along with widespread hunger and poverty. It is on the brink of an environmental catastrophe, and could be the first major city to run out of water. 

A group of activists have come up with an unconventional solution. Over the last month, they have encouraged young people to take to the streets to create graffiti that promotes peace. As one young activist told al Arabiya:

The walls are a canvas for spreading strong opinions by rivaling parties.

Below, some of the works created.

Photo credit: Mohamed Al-Sayaghi / Reuters

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