Reuters

A floating hotel created by a group of New York artists.

It's a clever idea - Boatel, a boat hotel made up of a dozen discarded boats in Far Rockaway, Queens. The resort, run by a group of artists, costs $55 to $100 a night; it has been booked most summer weekends. According to Curbed NY, one visitor documented the following:

There is no big "Boatel straight ahead!" sign at Marina 59, and no smiling sailors to greet you at the gate. You walk in and there is just an... actual marina with real boats. After some wandering (interloping, as they like to call it) we found "our" end of the pier, with the neon sign and a guy named T.J., who was a sweet if not socially compelling individual. He showed us our boat, our cooler, which was still full of his beer, and motioned to some folding chairs that he left on our back deck. Complimentary.

Below, scenes from the hotel:

All photos by Allison Joyce/Reuters

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A tow truck operator hooks up a damaged bus in 2011 in New York.
    POV

    Should Transit Agencies Panic?

    Many predict that new technology will doom public transportation. They’re wrong.  

  2. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

  3. Transportation

    How Toronto Turned an Airport Rail Failure Into a Commuter Asset

    The Union Pearson Express launched with expensive rides and low ridership. Now, with fares slashed in half and a light rail connection in the works, it’s a legitimate transit alternative for workers.

  4. A dockless bikeshare bike on the streets of D.C.
    Transportation

    What People Mean When They Call Dockless Bikeshare a 'Nuisance'

    In Washington, D.C., some residents are not enthusiastic about the free-range rent-a-bikes.

  5. Transportation

    The Automotive Liberation of Paris

    The city has waged a remarkably successful effort to get cars off its streets and reclaim walkable space. But it didn’t happen overnight.