Reuters

A floating hotel created by a group of New York artists.

It's a clever idea - Boatel, a boat hotel made up of a dozen discarded boats in Far Rockaway, Queens. The resort, run by a group of artists, costs $55 to $100 a night; it has been booked most summer weekends. According to Curbed NY, one visitor documented the following:

There is no big "Boatel straight ahead!" sign at Marina 59, and no smiling sailors to greet you at the gate. You walk in and there is just an... actual marina with real boats. After some wandering (interloping, as they like to call it) we found "our" end of the pier, with the neon sign and a guy named T.J., who was a sweet if not socially compelling individual. He showed us our boat, our cooler, which was still full of his beer, and motioned to some folding chairs that he left on our back deck. Complimentary.

Below, scenes from the hotel:

All photos by Allison Joyce/Reuters

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