Courtesy: Andrea Martiradonna

The CUBE, a mobile restaurant and event space, has graced landmarks in Brussels and Milan. Now it's headed to England in time for the Games.

Launched in the spring of 2011, The CUBE is now a well-worn traveler, moving from Brussels to Milan and now both Stockholm and London – just in time for this summer’s Olympic Games and accompanying festivities. Designed by architects Park Associati for electronics company Electrolux, the project was conceived as a mobile restaurant and event space that would simply "pop-up," as it were, at "unexpected and dramatic locations throughout Europe."

The 140 square-meter volume can accommodate up to 18 guests, who gorge on specially crafted meals prepared by an alternating roster of top international chefs. A 50 square-meter terrace extends beyond the dining space, with plenty of room for the flatulent guests to frolic and take in the impressive views unfolding in all directions ahead of them.

Now a year into operation, The CUBE has graced several landmark buildings, parasitically perched on the Cinquantenaire Arch in Brussels or opposite from the Duomo in Milan. At present, the jagged, lightweight structure projects just beyond the roof line of London’s Royal Festival Hall, where it will remain through the end of September.

All photos courtesy of Andrea Martiradonna

On the roof of the Royal Festival Hall, London, June 1-September 30, 2012






First stop: straddling the Cinquantenaire Arch, Brussels, April 2011




This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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