The locations where Facebook users check-in the most.

(Click the image for a larger version)

Sports arenas and a T.G.I. Friday's are among the top destinations for bored people to tell all their friends that they're sifting through status updates somewhere that's not home, alternately known as Facebook check-ins.

Facebook measured the number of "check-ins" at landmarks in 25 cities around the world since the product launched in August 2010.  

Some highlights from their findings:

  • T.G.I. Fridays was the top place to check-in in Oslo, Norway, while Hard Rock Cafes were popular in Buenos Aires, Delhi and Barcelona.
  • The most checked-in sites were sports stadiums and arenas (seven of the 25 destinations)
  • Public spaces -- like gardens, parks, or squares -- were the second-most checked-in places (with six)

While these destinations are considered "social" places in Facebook terms, they might be just the opposite in real-life terms.

Anyhow, here are the top digitally social (but in person maybe not so much) landmarks for eight of the cities:

(Click the image for a larger version) 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  2. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  3. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  4. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  5. Design

    Why Amsterdam’s Canal Houses Have Endured for 300 Years

    A different kind of wealth distribution in 17th-century Amsterdam paved the way for its quintessential home design.

×