The locations where Facebook users check-in the most.

(Click the image for a larger version)

Sports arenas and a T.G.I. Friday's are among the top destinations for bored people to tell all their friends that they're sifting through status updates somewhere that's not home, alternately known as Facebook check-ins.

Facebook measured the number of "check-ins" at landmarks in 25 cities around the world since the product launched in August 2010.  

Some highlights from their findings:

  • T.G.I. Fridays was the top place to check-in in Oslo, Norway, while Hard Rock Cafes were popular in Buenos Aires, Delhi and Barcelona.
  • The most checked-in sites were sports stadiums and arenas (seven of the 25 destinations)
  • Public spaces -- like gardens, parks, or squares -- were the second-most checked-in places (with six)

While these destinations are considered "social" places in Facebook terms, they might be just the opposite in real-life terms.

Anyhow, here are the top digitally social (but in person maybe not so much) landmarks for eight of the cities:

(Click the image for a larger version) 

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