The locations where Facebook users check-in the most.

(Click the image for a larger version)

Sports arenas and a T.G.I. Friday's are among the top destinations for bored people to tell all their friends that they're sifting through status updates somewhere that's not home, alternately known as Facebook check-ins.

Facebook measured the number of "check-ins" at landmarks in 25 cities around the world since the product launched in August 2010.  

Some highlights from their findings:

  • T.G.I. Fridays was the top place to check-in in Oslo, Norway, while Hard Rock Cafes were popular in Buenos Aires, Delhi and Barcelona.
  • The most checked-in sites were sports stadiums and arenas (seven of the 25 destinations)
  • Public spaces -- like gardens, parks, or squares -- were the second-most checked-in places (with six)

While these destinations are considered "social" places in Facebook terms, they might be just the opposite in real-life terms.

Anyhow, here are the top digitally social (but in person maybe not so much) landmarks for eight of the cities:

(Click the image for a larger version) 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Environment

    No, Puerto Rico’s New Climate-Change Law Is Not a ‘Green New Deal’

    Puerto Rico just adopted legislation that commits it to generating all its power from renewable sources. Here’s what separates that from what’s going on in D.C.

  2. a photo of Northern Virginia's Crystal City.
    Life

    When Your Neighborhood Gets a Corporate Rebrand

    From National Landing to SoHa, neighborhoods often find themselves renamed by forces outside the community, from big companies to real estate firms.

  3. Life

    Who’s Really Buying Property in San Francisco?

    A lot of software developers, according to an unprecedented new analysis.

  4. Equity

    What the Supreme Court Said About the 2020 Census Citizenship Question

    In oral arguments, conservative justices asked about data science, while liberals asked what the citizenship question was really for.

  5. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.