Reuters

Despite hopes, tourism hasn't pulled Greece out of its recession.

Greece's sandy resorts, azure waters and ancient temples are hot spots.

But visits from abroad are not enough to save the country from its ever-deepening recession. According to Reuters, tourist receipts for the first quarter tumbled by 15.1 percent to 396.3 million euros from 466.7 million euros. Below, what a slump looks like:

Konstas by his shop inside the medieval castle of Monemvasia.

Photo by Yannis Behrakis/Reuters

A Greek flag flutters as the sun sets on the beach front of Olympia Riviera resort in the town of Kyllini southwest of Athens. Photo by Yannis Behrakis/Reuters
Ruins are seen atop the medieval fortress of Monemvasia. Photo by Yannis Behrakis/Reuters



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