Hayashi Paper

A Japanese company is marketing an English version of "Drop," a horror story by The Ring author that's printed on TP.

I can't wait for the movie adaptation of this one!

"Drop" is a horror story released exclusively in the medium of toilet paper. Its author, Koji Suzuki, apparently wanted to try something lighter after completing his Ring novels, so he lent his creative vision to the bathroom project of Hayashi Paper, a company headquartered in the south-central Japanese city of Fuji. At three feet long, the story isn't quite the epic that toilet campers might prefer, but given the author's chilling oeuvre it should help relieve the most constipated of readers.

Hayashi Paper unleashed the first "Drop" on the Japanese toilet scene in 2009 and has since sold nearly 300,000 rolls at about $2.52 apiece, reportsThe Asahi Shimbun. (That report also notes that Japanese trade minister Yukio Edano has urged the company to "generate more ideas like this.") An English version of "Drop" was supposed to be released yesterday. However, I'm having a hard time finding it for sale on Hayashi's website or eBay. In a nonsurprise, it also has no presence on Amazon.

So what's the plot? Unsure, but the Japanese have long been enthralled with the concept of monsters lurking in commodes. So maybe it deals with Hanako-san, a dead girl in a red dress rumored to appear in the third stall of a girls' bathroom if you shout her name. Or perhaps it's about Aka Manto, an evil presence who breaks the reveries of poopers by asking them if they want red or blue toilet paper. If anybody has a copy, please leave it in the Atlantic's bathroom ASAP.

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