A toilet fixture in Brazil lets you shred on the guitar with the force of your urine.

Because everyone knows that business success relies on linking your brand to bodily waste, here is a urinal in Brazil from Billboard that lets you shred while peeing.

The face-melting bathroom fixture, conceived by ad agency Almap BBDO and 3-D modeled by Cricket Design, is making the rounds this summer of several bars in São Paulo. As you can see, “Guitar Pee” looks like a regular urinal with a fretboard sticking out of its top and an ominous electric cord connected to an amp on the wall. Make sure you're wearing rubber-soled shoes before whipping it out, lads!

Inside the cup of the pisser are little tabs jutting forth like the keys on an antique typewriter. Each tab triggers a different type of electric-guitar sample, allowing you to pump out a fierce solo with the force of your bladder's finest. Obvious songs to consider: Van Halen's “Eruption,” Guns N' Roses' “November Rain,” maybe Stevie Ray Vaughan's “Texas Flood.” Musicians who think this idea is disgusting can protest with “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.”

Flushing produces a code that allows you to access an online recording of the urinary masterpiece. This is the future: When companies are interested even in data-mining your pee.

Billboard deserves applause for originality. And considering how those flies painted on urinals allegedly reduce “spillage” by 80 percent, maybe even a pat on the back for promoting public hygiene. (That's assuming the splashback from those tabs isn't too vicious.) But with such a dude-centric ad campaign, the magazine is also alienating half of its potential readership.

We'll just have to wait for the feminine version to debut – perhaps a toilet for drum solos?

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