Artnet

Designers flipped a bronze scale model of the Taj Mahal for a table that sells for €36,000.

What is there to say about Studio Job‘s “Taj Mahal Table” that you can’t already (and quickly) see for yourself, you may ask? The humorous piece was produced for the Carpenters Workshop Gallery in London as part of an extremely limited edition of eight, each of which is retailing for €36,000 at Design/Miami Basel. The designers flipped a bronze scale model of India’s greatest monument on its head, both literally and figuratively, inverting the Taj’s skyward gaze and staining its gleaming white marble walls a matted black. Apart from other changes such as the guilding of the structure’s dome elements and the levelling of the minaret-cum-table legs, little of the architecture of the original was modified. Which is the point, else the irony of it all be lost. If anything, the piece reminds me of ‘Downton Abbey’s up/down hierarchical split, as depicted by that show’s opening title sequence. The birth of the next global television phenomenon?

Top image: Taj Mahal Table by Studio Mode via Artnet.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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