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London pays tribute to Saturday Night Fever with a party in some abandoned train tunnels.

Nostalgia for gritty old New York is always in style, but an opportunity like this is as rare as a bombed-out subway train.

From tonight until July 21, the performance space in London’s Old Vic Tunnels will host a Saturday Night Fever-themed party, complete with a custom-built set, “authentic food and drink vendors,” live music, and of course, a screening of the classic disco film starring John Travolta.

What separates this from your average disco night, though, is the venue: a collection of formerly abandoned train tunnels beneath London’s Waterloo Station. Actor Kevin Spacey, who was appointed artistic director of the Old Vic Theatre Company in 2003, engineered the 2010 purchase of the tunnels from the former British Railway Board. Since then, under artistic director Hamish Jenkinson, the Tunnels have played host to some innovative productions, earned the Old Vic a “Big Society Award” from British Prime Minister David Cameron, and most recently, cultivated a giant living fungus that got our attention here at Cities.

On Friday and Saturday, there will also be late-night dancing following the screening, so you can live out your disco dreams in London’s old train tunnels. Tony Manero would be proud.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Toolmantim

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