Courtesy: RIBA

A round-up of the buildings in use during the London games.

The 2012 Olympic Games are almost upon us! With tomorrow’s opening ceremony, London will welcome thousands of visitors into the Olympic Park, as well as the millions of viewers who will be watching the proceedings from their homes.

Many athletes will compete, hoping to win the gold and the glory, but many people do not realize that architecture is also an Olympic event. With many gigantic venues having to be built from scratch, the Olympics is a time for designers, from starchitects to unknowns, to prove their mettle. Here, we present a round-up of many of the Olympic projects we’ve covered, and some we haven’t.

Velodrome. Cycling. Hopkins Architects Partnership

Velodrome.

Shooting range. magma architecture Cycling. Hopkins Architects Partnership

Shooting range. magma architecture
Basketball Arena. Basketball, Handball. Wilkinson Eyre and Sinclair Knight Merz



Aquatics Centre. Swimming, Diving, Synchronized Swimming, Modern Pentathlon. Zaha Hadid Architects



Aquatics Centre. Swimming, Diving, Synchronized Swimming, Modern Pentathlon. Zaha Hadid Architects


The Copper Box. Handball, Modern Pentathlon. MAKE Architects, Populous


Inside the Copper Box. London 2012



Olympic Stadium. Athletics. Populous Architects. RIBA


Olympic Stadium. Athletics. Populous Architects. RIBA

Olympic Stadium. RIBA



Coca-Cola Beatbox. Pavilion. Asif Khan and Pernilla Ohrstedt

ArcellorMittal Orbit. Pavilion/bauble. Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond

BMW Group Pavilion. Pavilion. Serie Architects

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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